PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

PhD students' & Master students'

SUMMER CAMP

DAVID C. LEES: NEW MICROLEPIDOPTERA CURATOR AT THE NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM, LONDON

On January 4, 2016 I started my new duties as a curator of Microlepidoptera at the Natural History Museum, London (NHM). This is a great honour and also a responsibility. The Museum’s 80 million specimens form the World’s most important natural history collection. The entomology collection is the oldest and most important entomology collection of over 34 million insects and arachnids. These specimens, gathered over 300 years form the basis of taxonomic science, document the history of collecting, and underscore the human desire to understand the natural world. The scientific community uses this collection to answer key questions about the past, present and future of life on the planet (http://www.nhm.ac.uk/our-science/collections.html). I have worked at various times in the Natural History Museum since 1993 both as an employee and Scientific Associate and very much look forward to re-joining its staff again both as a Curator and also to conduct biodiversity research. The position is a pivotal one for the global community of taxonomists wishing to study the Museum holdings of Microlepidoptera. This collection is exceptionally rich in primary types. Access to the Museum's collections may be granted to professional entomologists, volunteer workers, members of natural history organisations, and even private citizens with high academic interest (for an appointment or loans you need to contact well in advance the appropriate collections manager to act as a host: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/our-science/collections/accessing-collections.html).

In the photographs: Entomology building of the Natural History Museum; David C. Lees and former curator of Microlepidoptera Kevin Tuck.